The Lockwood-Mathews Mansion Museum is regarded as one of the earliest and most significant Second Empire Style country houses in the United States. Built by renowned financier and railroad tycoon LeGrand Lockwood from 1864-1868, the Mansion, with its unparalleled architecture and interiors, illustrates magnificently the beauty and splendor of the Victorian Era.



Join us for an exhibition

Hues of Freedom

at

The Lockwood-Matthews Mansion Museum

from

October 27, through December 18, 2022

Artist Reception, Thursday, October 27 from 5:30 to 7:30 pm

295 West Avenue Norwalk, CT, USA

RSVP Here



The exhibition will be displayed in the Billiards Room at the Lockwood-Mathews Mansion Museum. An opening reception will be held on Thursday, October 27 for artists, their guests, and the public.

Hues of Freedom


As the word freedom can be subject to diverse interpretations, this exhibition will explore how artists depict the concept in their work, filtered through their creative process and drawn from their unique visualization of this multi-faceted concern be it in life, art, or history.

Linder is exhibiting a new series of paintings for Hues of Freedom. At first, you might think of American flags waving, and the colors red, white, and blue. But, this series is different, it goes back to the roots of what makes this country free, the people that demand freedom. The people that fight for freedom so that the next generation can benefit from their hard work and sacrifices.

Starting with non-traditional colors for his paintings Linder worked on the essence of what each of these moments in time was.



SELMA

36 x 36 in.

2022

Acrylic paint on canvas.

Selma, Alabama, the city is best known for the 1960s civil rights movement and the Selma to Montgomery marches, beginning with "Bloody Sunday" in 1965 and ending with 25,000 people entering Montgomery at the end of the last march to press for voting rights. This activism generated national attention for social justice and that summer, the Voting Rights Act of 1965 was passed by Congress to authorize federal oversight and enforcement of the constitutional rights of all American citizens.

More detail about this work here.





STONEWALL

36 x 36 in.

2022

Acrylic paint on canvas.

The Stonewall uprising was a series of spontaneous protests by members of the gay community in response to a police raid that began in the early morning hours of June 28, 1969, at the Stonewall Inn in the Greenwich Village neighborhood of Lower Manhattan in New York City. Patrons of the Stonewall, other Village lesbian and gay bars, and neighborhood street people fought back when the police became violent. The riots are widely considered the watershed event that transformed the gay liberation movement and the twentieth-century fight for LGBT rights in the United States.



ROE

36 x 36 in.

2022

Acrylic paint on canvas.

Roe v. Wade, 1973, was a landmark decision of the U.S. Supreme Court in which the Court ruled that the Constitution of the United States conferred the right to have an abortion. The decision struck down many federal and state abortion laws and caused an ongoing abortion debate in the United States about whether, or to what extent, abortion should be legal, who should decide the legality of abortion, and what the role of moral and religious views in the political sphere should be. The decision also shaped debate concerning which methods the Supreme Court should use in constitutional adjudication.



SUFFRAGETTE

36 x 36 in.

2022

Acrylic paint on canvas.

A suffragette was a member of an activist women's organization in the early 20th century who, under the banner "Votes for Women", fought for the right to vote in public elections in the United Kingdom. The term refers in particular to members of the British Women's Social and Political Union (WSPU), a women-only movement founded in 1903 by Emmeline Pankhurst, which engaged in direct action and civil disobedience. In 1906, a reporter writing in the Daily Mail coined the term suffragette for the WSPU, derived from suffragist╬▒ (any person advocating for voting rights), in order to belittle the women advocating women's suffrage. The militants embraced the new name, even adopting it for use as the title of the newspaper published by the WSPU.


More information about this exhibition here